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Ludorf manor in calendar 2019

Ludorf manor in calendar 2019

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A manor house for a whole group!

A manor house for a whole group!

The guest house Zietlitz offers the suitable ambience for family celebrations, small seminars, groups of friends of historical manor houses; nature lovers, yoga groups and much more.

Gutshaus Zietlitz


Manor House Levetzow

Levetzow, also mentioned as Levezow, is the name of an old Mecklenburg noble family. First mentioned in a document on June 18th, 1262, the dynasty gave its name to the village which is located amidst an original end moraine landscape just a few kilometres away from the coastal town of Wismar and was its owner for at least 180 years.




On September 29th in 1443 (fief letter) Johann von Bassewitz becomes owner `of estate and village´ due to his second marriage to an heiress nee von Levetzow and establishes a more than 200-year history of the von Bassewitz family at the feudal estate. This widespread and often well-off family unit owns numerous estates in the southern area of Wismar. Levetzow becomes one of their ancestral homes.

During the following centuries the owners change frequently. In 1656, Matthias Vollrath von Gühlen purchases the 342-hectare estate with three virgata of land in Kritzow and four virgata in Hohen Viecheln and it was kept in this family for three generations. From 1714 to 1788, representatives of the noble dynasties of the von Schack, again von Gühlen, Bernhard Christoph von Scheelen (also squire of the estate Zülow near Sternberg) and Christian Diederich von Gütschow (at the same time hereditary owner of the estate Besitz) appeared as owners until finally the bourgeois Johann Ludewig Diederich Bade purchases the estate and signs the fief letter on October 23rd 1788. For several generations Levetzow remains now in possession of the Bade family.

In 1804 Elert August Bade built today's manor house (left part of the building) largely on the foundations of the previous building. By purchase it comes to Paul Friedrich Christian Seeler on May 10th in 1875, he already appeared as the tenant of the estate for the four preceding years. During the following year of 1876 he had the transept (right part of the building) added and had the entire cubage redesigned in neo-Gothic style by the architect Heinrich Thormann. In 1908 Paul Seeler´s son Carl Heinrich Friedrich Emil Paul Seeler took over the estate. In 1925, he had to submit the declaration of assets and so Dr. Walter Olischläger came into possession of the property from the auction in 1926. His son Hans Ohlischläger successfully runs the estate until the expropriation after the end of WWII. At the end of the 1930s, numerous farm buildings were rebuilt, of which three and a small estate manager´s house have been preserved. Nowadays, after reconstruction and extension, these are used as residential buildings.

The manor house Levetzow, a two-storey building on a T-shaped ground with a high boulder base and Gothic lancet windows in the attic gables, shares its fate with many similar manor complexes after 1945. The land of the estate was divided up; the manor house served as accommodation for refugees from 1946 onwards. Later the house is briefly used as a boarding school for the training of new teachers and then housed a co-op shop, a community hall, and some flats. Despite structural decline, the neo-Gothic appearance with four stepped gables, a 3/6th bay window with Gothic pointed arch niches, the staircase and gallery in the vestibule, spatial structures such as the Small Garden Hall, several floor coverings and the barrel vaulting of the cellars from the second half of the 19th century have been preserved.

In 2011, a private owner acquired the house and some of the land and began with the careful renovation. In 2019 the manor house is inhabited by this owner, a granite-stone paved driveway and a roundabout create a historical grandly atmosphere to the bright white building with entrance portal; landscape conservation measures are slowly taking effect in the former park. The renovation process will continue for several more years and will eventually allow a mixed use of the manor house with some holiday apartments, premises of limited public use and the letting of commercial units with a representative character.


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